When You Don’t Know What To Pray

When I don’t know what to pray I like to look at Philippians 4:6-7 which says, “Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.”

I love this verse because it gives us direct instruction on what to do when we’re needing direction in our prayer lives. Not knowing what to pray isn’t an excuse not to pray. God wants us to come to Him with anything and everything. We could talk to Him about something as simple as our agenda for the day and He would love that time spent with Him.

Pray for guidance, joy, peace, or whatever you need at that point in time. God will NEVER turn you away, no matter how long you’ve been pushing him away.

CHRIST LIVES IN ME!

When I was younger and I meditated on the birth and life of Jesus and then contemplated his death, it made me extremely sad that an innocent man would be executed. It was emotional for me as if I was watching a sad movie.

But now I see it a little different. While what I was seeing was true I also understand the plan that God was fulfilling. Galatians 2:20, “I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me.”

As our Lord hung on the cross, the crowd saw only one man on the center cross. But the Father saw not just Christ but you and me and all others who would put their faith in Christ. When we come to Jesus, God takes our old life from us (“I have been crucified with Christ”) and puts a new life in us (“Christ lives in me”). The Christian life is not a changed life; it is an EXCHANGED life. You give Christ your old life, and He puts it away in a sea of forgetfulness. And He gives you a brand new life, a new life in Christ. It is an awesome and joyous thought: “Christ lives in me!”

Fully Using God’s Word

God’s word, the Bible, is essential to our spiritual growth and to our understanding of our identity in Christ.

Psalm 119 gives many examples how we can use the Bible.

  • sing the word (172)
  • speak the word (13, 46, 79)
  • study the word (15, 48, 97, 148)
  • store up the word (11, 93, 141)
  • obey the word (8, 44, 57, 129, 145, 167)
  • praise God for the word (7, 62, 164, 171)
  • pray that God would act according to his word (58, 121-23, 147, 149-52, 153-60)

How many of these are you doing? How often? These are the best indicators of what we really believe and feel about the Word.

The Day is Coming When God Will No Longer Need the Ministry of Pain

Isaiah 35:10,

And those the Lord has rescued will return.
They will enter Zion with singing;
everlasting joy will crown their heads.
Gladness and joy will overtake them,
and sorrow and sighing will flee away.

Revelation 21:4,

 He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.

The day is coming when God will no longer need the ministry of pain. But that day cannot come until all the causes of pain have been removed. Christ came not to cleanse the leper’s scab, nor to make every lame man walk, nor to call the dead back to life.  He would not have skipped his own hours of weeping. He came to deliver us from pain by quenching the bitter sources from which its streams issued. He came to redeem the world from that curse, of which pain is only one consequence. He came to vanquish the wrong and to cancel the long inheritance of evil which lies behind all pain.

Avoiding Temptation of Despair

Isaiah 11:1 says,

A shoot will come up from the stump of Jesse;
    from his roots a Branch will bear fruit.

Salvation comes to us in smallness, weakness, and hiddenness.

That gives me hope. I keep expecting big and loud events to convince me and others of God’s saving power. But that’s only what the world offers on cable news and social media. Our temptation is to be distracted by them and made blind to the “shoot that shall sprout from the stump.”

When I don’t see the small signs of God’s presence–the smile of a baby, the carefree play of children, the encouraging hug of a friend–I will always remain tempted to despair.

The baby of Bethlehem, the carpenter of Nazareth, the naked man on the cross asks for my full attention. The work of salvation takes place in the midst of a world that continue to shout, scream, and overwhelm us with its claims and promises. But the promise is hiding in the shoot that sprouts from the stump, a shoot that hardly anyone notices.