Jesus Didn’t Just Save Us, He Sends Us

“As you go, proclaim this message: ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’ Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse those who have leprosy, drive out demons. Freely you have received; freely give.”  Matthew 10:7-8

Jesus didn’t come just to save a few people and then go back to the Father. He came to save the whole world, and He invites us to help Him do it. Just as He called the first apostles, Jesus calls us to proclaim the Good News of salvation and help those in need.

He chose disciples not just to SAVE them, but to SEND them out to touch other people’s lives with healing and love.

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Love Your Enemies

Romans 12:17-21

Do not repay anyone evil for evil. Be careful to do what is right in the eyes of everyone. 18 If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone. 19 Do not take revenge, my dear friends, but leave room for God’s wrath, for it is written: “It is mine to avenge; I will repay,” says the Lord. 20 On the contrary:

“If your enemy is hungry, feed him;
    if he is thirsty, give him something to drink.
In doing this, you will heap burning coals on his head.”

21 Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

Basic principle: “Do not repay anyone for evil.” “Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.”

Paul says that to repay evil with evil is immediately to lose the battle to evil. The only way to defeat evil is by doing good to the one who has done harm. The only way to defeat evil is to forgive and love the person. Another way to put it is that when we identify “evil” too closely with the “evildoer,” we believe we need to destroy the evildoer in order to destroy evil. So it seems good to do evil, and we unwittingly become a pawn of the evil force behind the evildoer.

Our basic goal is to forgive, love and show kindness to the evildoer. When we do, there are two results. First, the spread of evil is checked toward us. Its hatred and pride do not infect us. Second, the spread of evil may be checked in the evildoer. He or she may be softened and helped by our love.

What does this mean?

  1. Do not avoid a hostile person. See verse 18. Your avoidance could well be a form of payback.
  2. Express loving words and actions. See verse 20.
  3. Forgive and forego repayment. See verse 19.

CAVEAT! There are boundaries! Verse 9 reminds us that we are not truly loving when we enable someone to sin or sin against us. Enemies that are still currently dangerous should be avoided. We need to discern our motive for avoiding but these principles do not apply to someone who is trying to physically harm you or someone you love.

A Biblical Command I Rarely See Obeyed

1 Thessalonians 5:15…

Look for the best in each other, and always do your best to bring it out.

Wow! Ouch! We rarely heed this biblical command. “Look for the best” when we focus on the worst? “Do your best to bring it out” when we scoff and discourage? Imagine if every Christian on social media this! Imagine if every politician that claimed Christ did this in reference to their opposition!

What are ways we can “bring the best” out of people?

Follow God’s Example

Ephesians 5:1-2 says,

Follow God’s example, therefore, as dearly loved children and walk in the way of love, just as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us as a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God.

Imitating God means imitating His Son, and that means doing whatever is required to make our lives a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God.

This image is from the Old Testament sacrifices where the people brought an offering to God and sacrificed it upon the altar so that its fiery consumption would cause the odor of a sweet sacrifice to God.

This reminds us that the fragrance from an altar does not come without some giving of self (an  offering) and some dying of another (sacrifice).  There is no life of love without a degree of giving and dying.

All who would be like Jesus must offer and sacrifice themselves.  Luther taught that if we are truly to imitate Christ, then we must also in some measure suffer for the sins of others.  The Reformer did not mean that we can atone for others’ sin, but we suffer for their sake as we endure suffering so that we might know Him.

God’s Love Went Beyond Fairness

Matthew 20:1-16

“For the kingdom of heaven is like a landowner who went out early in the morning to hire workers for his vineyard. He agreed to pay them a denarius for the day and sent them into his vineyard.

“About nine in the morning he went out and saw others standing in the marketplace doing nothing. He told them, ‘You also go and work in my vineyard, and I will pay you whatever is right.’ So they went.

“He went out again about noon and about three in the afternoon and did the same thing. About five in the afternoon he went out and found still others standing around. He asked them, ‘Why have you been standing here all day long doing nothing?’

“‘Because no one has hired us,’ they answered.

“He said to them, ‘You also go and work in my vineyard.’

“When evening came, the owner of the vineyard said to his foreman, ‘Call the workers and pay them their wages, beginning with the last ones hired and going on to the first.’

“The workers who were hired about five in the afternoon came and each received a denarius. 10 So when those came who were hired first, they expected to receive more. But each one of them also received a denarius. 11 When they received it, they began to grumble against the landowner. 12 ‘These who were hired last worked only one hour,’ they said, ‘and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the work and the heat of the day.’

13 “But he answered one of them, ‘I am not being unfair to you, friend. Didn’t you agree to work for a denarius? 14 Take your pay and go. I want to give the one who was hired last the same as I gave you. 15 Don’t I have the right to do what I want with my own money? Or are you envious because I am generous?’

16 “So the last will be first, and the first will be last.”

God’s love went beyond fairness.

I sometimes resonate with that sense of unfairness. Until I ask, “Would I really have it any other way?” If I take utterly seriously God’s standards for parenting, for marriage, for loving my neighbor, using my talents, am I a 6am worker or a late afternoon worker?

The whole life of Jesus, His death and resurrection revealed our concerned, loving, compassionate God doing what I desperately need, not what I deserve.